Koppikers Mumbai Home

Koppikers Mumbai Home

The home that we speak of today is bang in the middle of a busy road in Mumbai. As I look for the address, I am quite sure that I have come to the wrong place. The pictures that I had seen could never be in such a prime busy part of the city. And guess what!

I am in for a huge surprise!

Koppikers Mumbai home
Garden goals
Beautiful gardens
Frontyard
Koppikers Home tour
Living room
Beautiful Indian home
Spacious living room

As I open the gate I stand there stunned. Not just for the lush greenery that I see but also the beautiful entrance, the Oasis of calm that it appears. The look is no less than a palace. The entrance is Royal and has stolen quite a few hearts. The home that I speak of today belongs to Nivedita and Nitin Koppiker. 

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Nivedita Koppiker
Beautiful Indian Home
Nivedita Koppiker

Flashback to a couple of months ago…when I saw this beautiful entrance in one of the saree groups, I immediately messaged Nivedita if I could do a home tour. All it took was a phone call and one question on the entrance. We walked down memory lane…. It was on a trip to Kerala and coconut lagoon that Nivedita decided that she wanted an entrance with old wooden pillars. They were renovating their home and the trip was a deciding factor on the look and feel of the home. Having made up her mind, when she found the first two antique pillars on sale, she immediately booked them. But they seemed incomplete without a base and after several trips to Chor bazaar she found the exact match for the base. The brass details on the pillars were added later. The main door was another important feature and after hunting everywhere for the perfect door, she decided to get it done. Sitting with the carpenter she would give him sketches and instructions. Not letting him be until he got it right. 

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Dining overlooking the garden
Oasis of calm
Block printed curtains
Dining overlooking the garden
Koppikers Mumbai Home
Kitchen goals
The kitchen

But after our initial rapport we could not go ahead with the home tour blog as she was not sure of what pictures I will need. So when I needed to go to Mumbai on work I decided to happily pop in at her place. The gracious hostess that she was, I was invited for lunch.

Koppikers Mumbai home
Details in railing design
Tile embedded in the staircase
Motifs in wood
Details
Koppikers Mumbai home
Staircase details
Beautiful Indian Home
Collectibles

The most amazing aspect of this house is her involvement in every piece of design that became part of her home. Right from the entrance, the feel and look, to the motifs of lotus used on wooden panels and chairs. Purchased in 1994, the duplex row house was renovated in 2005. With the help of architect Mr. Ganesh Shenoy she was able to bring her dream house to life.

As we enter the home, we get a view of the staircase, with doors to the kitchen and passage to the dining. The area below the staircase has been used very well and leads to the dining. The best part here is that beautiful lush front yard can be seen from the living, kitchen and Dining room. And it has my heart. Such an idyllic scene to look at the whole day. The verandah also has comfortable planter chairs for some relaxing. The pergola is a recent addition and I can imagine the treat its going to be in a couple of months.

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Beautiful Indian Home
Verandah
Verandah

The Koppikers collected different pieces of furniture over the years and some were very lucky finds. The heavy wooden antique book case, the sofa sets in wood were mostly bought in the US during their stay there. Most of the furniture is in wood with cane backing and they bring an organic ambience to the home. The distressed wooden sculptures she picked up at different places gives her home an antique vibe. The Kamadhenu on the landing, the ducks in the entrance foyer are all such finds. The Hanuman in Kinhal is a recent purchase and she smiles fondly remembering the struggle it was to convince the airlines to allow the transport and all the packing it involved.

Koppikers Mumbai home
Beautiful Indian homes
Baithak
Family room
Koppikers Mumbai Home
Brass collection
View from the kitchen
View from the kitchen

The kitchen was definitely a favourite with me. The rooster collection, the ceramics, plants in pretty planters, baskets and glass with the quaint seating for two ….all of them are picture perfect. The kitchen also overlooks the lush greenery outside. Though I am not a big fan of cooking, I could cook here forever. On second thoughts maybe I would just sit with a book and a cuppa looking at all the greenery.

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Kitchen entrance
Rooster collection
Kitchen ambience
At the kitchen entrance

Nivedita has put in a lot of thought into every aspect of designing the furniture, wardrobes and even frames. The cane weaves from Assam that have been sandwitched between glass , the jute backing for brass figurines are just some examples in this lovely home.

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Beautiful Indian Homes
Bedroom vibes
Koppikers Mumbai home
Prabhavalis in decor
Beautiful Indian home
Family room on the first floor
Koppikers Mumbai Home
Indian Art
Beautiful Indian home
Staircase landing wall
Koppikers Mumbai home
Kinhal Hanuman
Brass collection
Coffee table decor

Where the neighbours have used every inch of available space to extend their homes, she has ingenuously used the extended walls to bring in some old world charm in her green space. The old wooden shutters with lamps hanging at different levels, gives this space a vintage look. 

Koppikers Mumbai Home
Buddha in the garden
Vintage vibes
View from the gate
Koppikers Mumbai home
Beautiful Indian homes
The drawing room
Koppikers Mumbai Home
Beautiful Indian Homes
Planter chairs
The Verandah

As we sit down for lunch and I relish a home cooked meal, I don’t want to leave and wish I could remember this place forever. And I think I will…. wouldn’t you?

PS- I had so many beautiful images from this home that I was at a loss on which ones to keep from this post. So will put up a video soon.

Lots of twinkles to all of you

Anu

Home tour – Dr.Kumar & Mrs. Vasudha

Home tour – Dr.Kumar & Mrs. Vasudha

Architect Mies van der Rohe believed that God is in the details. If God is in the details, then this home is a temple.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar
A beautiful corner

I went over to Vasudha Aunty’s place to deliver Venki Palimar’s terracotta sculpture and ended up clicking pictures and requesting a home tour. Sometimes you connect to people irrespective of age or any other social parameters. Our love for art and décor was an instant connector and we bonded just like that.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #woodencarving #Karikuddi
Beautiful carved Goddess



An aesthetically decorated home built over two levels, her love for Indian art and sculptures is reflected in her rich collection of over 30 years. She tells me about her hunts in the different parts of Bangalore looking for treasures which now have pride of place. Right at the entrance you get a glimpse of the personality of the home maker. A beautiful mail box painted in Madhubani greets the visitors and the quaint bell announces her love for brass. In the cosy garden by the car park area Vasudha Aunty has used the compound wall to make a statement.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #mailbox #Madhubani #entrance
The colourful entrance

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #garden #compoundwall #plantsathome
The Garden decor

Beautiful soft stone sculptures of Hanuman, Nandi and many more in nooks bring an ethereal appeal to the garden. Offset by the greens of the plants and terracotta sculptures I can only imagine how relaxing it must be to sit by this in twilight with lights glimmering.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #originalpaintings
The warm living area



Her collection is so vast that she cannot display them all. Her doll collection in Kinhal is something I am looking forward to. Just one or two pieces were outside and the rest were packed away. I can’t wait for Dasara and Gombehabba display at their place.

Warli Art mural
#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #madhubanimural #artonachair
Madhubani Mural and a colourful chair

You will notice a lot of artwork which she picked up at the different Chitrasanthes. She has her favourites and goes back to their stalls every year! The wide range in woodwork carvings is picked up by her on holidays in Karikkudi. She recalls these shopping trips with a twinkle in her eye, remembering what a steal the panel was. In fact she recalls that there was a gentleman who immediately offered her a price three times of what she paid. But she tells me that she had already fallen in love with the piece and refused the tempting offer.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #carvedpanel
Beautiful collection of Carved Panels

Dr. Kumar and Vasudha Aunty have built this home with love and this is reflected in the well preserved beautiful warli art by their daughter Sowmya. She has inherited her mom’s love for art and has painted a chair in pretty bright colours. Aunty has lovingly kept her son’s and daughter’s toys which form a display all on their own.

#kinhal #hometour #indianhome #cornerdecor #indiandecor #VasudhaKumar #originalpaintings
Original Artwork collections

They have also built a farmhouse in the traditional style with an open atrium and Atthangudi tiles for flooring. I have been invited to visit the farmhouse and I can’t wait to see it. Vasudha Aunty,an endearing lady with a warm home reflecting her personality and love for Indian aesthetics, this lady has my heart.

Lots of twinkles

Anu

Heritage home Mayagundi

Heritage home Mayagundi

Heritage home Mayagundi

Kinhal finds a home at Mayagundi

 

Even before I enter the Heritage home in Mayagundi my eyes chance upon a beautiful Kinhal doll as big as me. Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat tells me that he found it washed away on the beach with just the leg showing up from beneath the sand. He had it dug up and got the doll home. It used to be part of a temple and was left into the water when damaged. Though a lot of superstitions are attached to old things, Mr. Bhat only sees the aesthetic value and the heritage it represents.

Heritage home

Traditional architecture style

 

Mangalore tiles and rafters with open courtyard

Peek into the Heritage home Mayagundi

He started collecting old materials from homes being demolished nearly 20 years back. That was when he dreamt of constructing an organic home reminiscent of times gone by. This heritage home at Mayagundi is just that. As he takes us through the different sections, he recalls what it was like so many years ago. He would go to homes being demolished in the interiors of Karnataka with a truck and people would bring antiques , old boxes, vessels,furniture and fill up the truck. He shows me a beautiful wooden chest given away. A carved panel he rescued before it was burnt as firewood and many such gems. Off course when he got them they were not as beautiful. It takes a connoisseur to recognise their value and Mr. Bhat restores them to their lost beauty.

Building materials from demolished homes

The kitchen and open dining

 

There are many stories and memories attached to each and every piece in his collection. The beautiful statues of the thirteen Tirthankaras are one such memory. These were part of a house bought by Muslims and guessing it must be a deity, Mr Bhat was given a call. He also has a collection of musical instruments, old books and books on art and heritage. This heritage home gives us a glimpse of life as it used to be a mere fifty to hundred years ago.

 

Heritage home Mayagundi

Tirthankaras

 

The beauty of this Heritage home is it’s organic structure called the ‘chaukmalle’ or the central courtyard surrounded by pillars and the rest of the home. The courtyard which is open to the elements in nature is not only energy efficient but also the Brahma Sthan or the place of divinity.  In traditional homes this was the place to plant the holy basil. After the porch area which is an open forum for informal conversations, there is the verandah and then the inner courtyard which is bright and airy. I can only imagine what bliss it must be to sit here and be part of nature even as you enjoy the cool home. The roof of this heritage home is made of Mangalore tiles on wooden rafters, all rescued from old homes. The kitchen is fully furnished with all the old vessels which would have been a part of our ancestors’ lives. Vessels made of stone, mud and kanchu. Having a bathroom as well, this is a fully furnished home. He tells me that during the day he invariably spends his time here, with a book and a cup of tea.

Heritage home Mayagundi

The library nook. Image credit Preethi Prabhu

As we step out onto the backyard I notice that the window has no panels and I ask about Intruders or animals getting in. Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat smiles and shows me how the whole set up works. The window is a complete set with a wooden bench and this can be lifted to close the window. Such a beautiful concept and so sturdy I was truly stunned.

The amazing foldable window seat

The amazing foldable window seat. Image credit – Preethi Prabhu

 

We talk of the engineering concepts incorporated in design hundreds of years ago and the beauty and details which were a part of any design or work. Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat proudly tells us that the house was constructed without the use of cement, glass or iron.  Laterite stone powdered, limestone and jaggery is mixed and used between the bricks to put them together. Preethi asks about reinforcement and he tells us that this can be used for slabs as well. The plastering was done by hand with organic materials such as limestone and jaggery. An old man who knew the work was brought in to supervise the construction.

The organic texture of the walls

The organic texture of the walls

Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat recalls how he had a tough time getting someone who knew this work to supervise the construction. It was finally a man in his seventies who would sit and oversee the work. The uniqueness of this house is in the fact that all the materials were restored and reused from houses being demolished. He goes to the interiors of Kundapur to look for such treasures. He has a business concern of such old materials, but pieces that touch his heart find a home here.

 

 

Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat at the Heritage Home Mayagundi

Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat

It is not surprising that many are unaware of this beautiful home. Mr. Krishnamoorthy Bhat always discouraged any commercial use of the property. It is only for the art lovers and those who value heritage that the doors open. A beautiful musical has also been shot here and he loves to organise classical musical evenings here. Very recently there was a live watercolour demonstration by artist Mr. Somayaji as part of the cultural art program organised by Drishya school of art. This was one of the many events which take place here.

 

Heritage Home Mayagundi

Heritage Home Mayagundi

 

Heritage home Mayagundi

Heritage home Mayagundi

 

Heritage home set amidst nature

Heritage home set amidst nature

 

He also shows us the unique lock and key on the front door. As he locks the door I wish I could stay here forever. But luckily for me he says I could come again. So until next time.

 

Lots of Twinkles to you.

Anu

 

 

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

The idea was not to go to a museum. It was just another beach holiday. Though we were born and brought up literally next to the beach, once you uproot yourself and live elsewhere, the beach has a special pull. And with a five year old, reason goes right out of the window…otherwise who in their right senses thinks of a beach at 11 in the morning? Well to cut the long story short, we just gave in to her demands and set off for the beach.

Museum of Goa - A must visit

Museum of Goa

At the intersection to Calangute beach, we see a board ‘Museum of Goa’ History of Goa through contemporary art..five minutes away. Well, guess what? We take a detour. I think so much like life…you set out with a plan but life offers you an unexpected choice and you change your mind. Everything happens for a reason. The Museum changed the way I saw art and especially contemporary art. I think just like the artist Subodh Kerkar, whose work is displayed at the museum, I have to start educating myself on how to interpret this beautiful medium of expression.

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

A holiday in Goa cannot be complete without a visit to this museum. Right from social, economic, religious and emotional aspects, it explores Goa through the medium of the ocean, shells, coconuts, chillies, laterite stones, indigo dyes and all that has shaped, transformed and made Goa, the Goa we all know. Subodh Kerkar’s work explores the many social, economic, emotional layers of Goa and the Goans. Also on display are works by other artists …..

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

The video happening in the auditorium gives us a glimpse into the artists mind and motivation. Subodh Kerkar is a successful doctor turned to watercolour artist to an ocean artist working in contemporary art and art installations. His work speaks of his evolution and inturn helps us evolve and learn. I especially loved the different formations by the fishermen as a boat, a fish demonstrating their oneness with the ocean. Their life and fortune is entwined with the ocean and the tides. This depiction totally moves an empathetic audience.

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Then there was the collaboration with the ocean….sounds wierd right? How can an artist collaborate with nature or something as vast as an ocean? The artist Subodh Kerkar,   deposited antique ceramic plates in cages on the ocean bed and after months when they were retrieved, they had oysters and pearls on them.

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

Museum of Goa

And these are just some of the many exhibits here. A lady we met, a visitor from London got talking to us. She shared that she came every year to Goa and every year there was something new to see and experience. That’s Goa for you. A beautiful place full of art, beaches and good food …I could see many art installations at different places in the state. Definitely worth visiting again and more leisurely next time.
Twinkles to all of you.
Anu
Ps- the museum of Goa has a minimum ticket fare of 100/- for Indians and 300/- for foreign nationals.
Beauty of Handmade

Beauty of Handmade

This was the eighth annual collective by AHH (a not for profit organization), but the first one that I attended. I had plans of being there every day but couldn’t make it on the last day. It was such a colourful treat that coming away from it every day was a big challenge. But at the end of the day though I was tired, my soul was happy for having seen such talent and beauty of Handmade around me. On my first day I was lucky to get the Madhubani artist Vidushini Prasad and the Kaavad artist Dwarka Prasad Jangid to talk to me about their work. After that they were totally busy and on the last day I could see that all the beautiful Kaavad stories had found new homes.

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

I was also amazed at the energy levels of Mala Dhawan and Sonia Dhawan. They were taking care of every aspect and together with the volunteers did an amazing job at the bazaar. It was the culmination of months of preparation and planning. The artisans and artists were all happy with the successful bazaar. Inspite of the rains and the cold weather Bangaloreans turned up in good numbers and the kaarigars did brisk business.

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

If Day 1 was all about seeing all the stalls and shopping to my heart’s content, Day 2 was about introducing my five year old to the talent and beauty of handmade. She had a lovely time, not only shopping but also making new friends and a trial at being a volunteer. She loved putting the stamp on all those who paid the entry fee. Thank you so much Anjali for the experience. She totally loved it. The cloth bags by A Hundred Hands were available for block printing and she happily indulged herself there. She was over the moon when the kaarigar told her that she did a good job and was very strong. I am happily carrying this bag with pride, after all it says I support handmade. This simple bag with blocks printed by my child is an ambassador for the beauty of Handmade.

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Dolls Everywhere- This could be the tagline…when the dolls from Coimbatore met the dolls in Bengaluru. Aradhya all of four and my girl became instant friends. My child also gave her a tip on where she could buy the Kannamma doll. And as we were browsing through the stalls, these two met again. Each one with her doll, named and loved already. They would say goodbye when it was time to leave but again get back to play. It was a lovely sight to behold.

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Then there were the books by Tulika… wow…what lovely books. I was like a child in a candy shop. Both my daughter and I picked up books after books. With a heavy heart I left behind so many. But I buy books very often. So some for next time! I especially loved their ‘Looking at Art’ series, ‘Under the Banyan’ series, Gajapathi Kulapathi, the gentle elephant and the A to Z of Ajrakh. Books are a beautiful way to introduce children to the beauty of handmade and folk art.

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Day 3 was again a ‘just me’ time (don’t we all need that?) at the collective. Not only did I get talking to some kaarigars and artists but I also went over the top with pictures. It was so colourful…I couldn’t resist it. The Dhokra artist Rajib Maiti from Chattisgarh, Jagadish who works with leaves and onion peels, the banana fibre accessories by Gramya, Vidya Nag from Aardra who weaves newspapers, Purkal Sthree Shakthi ladies from Himachal with beautiful quilted work, the handmade dolls from Coimbatore by Shivanjali Creative Arts and Crafts, the weavers from Benares, Srutiza from RishamJewelry who weaves beads like our grandmothers used to (Detailed posts on all of them in queue). The Kerala mural work on wooden chest, the leather puppetry, Orissa Pattachitra, Miniature art, Jute and cloth weaving, beauties in glass, Himalayan Weavers working with Yak wool, Pipli work from Orissa, Batik like never before by Shunya Batik, Klaykarma with ceramic art…they were all there along with so many more talented artists.

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Day 4 was again shopping with my cousin who is crazy about sarees. My daughter wanted to join us and off we went on a shopping spree. The Kalamkari artist from Tirupati, Raavilla helped us identify handpainted and screen printed Kalamkari, the elaborate process on colouring and sketching. It was very informative…

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Soon the sarees from Orissa were beckoning to us, the Sambhalpuri ikats. The beauty of the weaves, the subtle colours all handwoven won our hearts and made our pockets lighter. I off course had already done a lot of shopping. So I have told my cousin to lend her saree to me next time..it’s a win win you see. What do you think?

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

The Bengal tants, with pattachitra were also very tempting. So too the Sandoor Chitrika collaboration resulting in beautiful duppattas and blouse pieces with lambani embroidery. I loved so many things at the collective…it is impossible to choose a favourite. I also got a soft soft stole from Aranya. I also found these masks and a cute minion set in nesting dolls. After this it was time to take a break and have something yummy and scrumptious.

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

Beauty of Handmade at A Hundred Hands

 

The food stalls were all we needed and on our way out, I spotted the ‘Big Bad Wolf’…a venture on homemade yummy jams, jellies and chutneys by an architect! The plum and orange concoction was to die for…ummmm. A lot of organic food products, organic balms by Granny Gregs ( I loved the orange lip balm) beautiful handmade clothes, upcycled products such as the Denim Project by AHH, Bags and lamps made of waste plastic by Aarohana, art and craft…what else can a person ask for? It was a great evening and I happily came home all excited about the last day. There were a series of Art Appreciation workshops lined up. The Benares weaving workshop which I attended on day4 was not only about gorgeous sarees and weaving but also the kind of work and planning that goes into a single piece. Anyone who wears a saree or spends for one, should understand the process to really appreciate that it is a true labour of love. These workshops help us appreciate the beauty of Handmade. Unfortunately I couldn’t go on the last day. Well not to worry, the collective is coming to fort Kochi and Coimbatore later this month. Check the AHH facebook page for more details. If you can make it, don’t miss it.

 

Lots of twinkles to all of you.

Anupama

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan

He does not tire easily…in the forty minutes that I was there, Dwarka Prasad Jangid easily re told the story of Ramayana, Mahabharata, Meena and Krishna at least three times. And how! With pictures painted on the panels of the Kaavad from Rajasthan, a mobile temple or story telling on the go…it is an art of story telling which is easily 500 years old. Made of wood from the mango tree, it is a box which consists of panels of paintings opening to reveal hidden stories, panel after panel. Just like a temple, the doors are guarded by the two sentries, Jaya Vijay (You can check out their story here.) As the doors open, the story is revealed…and stops at the innermost sanctum sanctorium. The bigger, more elaborate Kaavads also have additional panels on stories of people. The Kaavad also has a compartment for money. There is a disclaimer on the Kaavad that the money given to the story teller will be utilised for the holy cows. And all those who listen to the story will be rewarded and blessed. But if the story is not heard, then they will be cursed. 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan. Pic Credit – Tejasweeni Iyer

 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan. Pic Credit – Tejasweeni Iyer

 

This art is from Rajasthan and though not known to many urbanites, in the villages, it is a ritual to call the story teller. The story teller wraps it in cloth and carries it around on his shoulder.They travel from place to place and each story teller has patrons where he visits repeatedly, not just to tell them stories from mythology but also to recall the family’s forefathers whose names and deeds he talks of. This is a sacred ritual for the family where they remember their forefathers and also listen to stories from mythology. Dwarka Prasad Jangid from Chittorgarh tells me that it all started when temples were being destroyed by invaders. The mobile temple, the Kaavad from Rajasthan was how the stories and Gods continued to spread, in all their glory. 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Painting on fabric from Rajasthan. Pic Credit – Tejasweeni Iyer

 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan

 

This art is also an example of how with the changing times, the artisan also changes. There is this story of Meena, a girl in Rajasthan, who is given an opportunity to study when her teacher convinces her father. She studies diligently, goes to London for her higher studies and also exhibits her father’s art work there. She comes back to India and starts a self help group and a school for girls. One educated girl changes the future of many...”Beti Bachao Beti Padhao.”(Save and educate the girl child) and off course in the end, she gets married to a suitable boy selected by her parents (after all it’s the ideal happily ever after scenario) I loved this story. It has all the elements of our mega serials but without the drama. It is a story of hope. This Kaavad from Rajasthan symbolises our hope as a nation.

 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan

I got a small ‘Kaavad’ for myself. Every handicraft has a story to tell and more so, the Kaavad from Rajasthan. It calls to me as it does to so many others to take it home and continue the saga of story telling. So when you are at the eighth edition of A Hundred Hands annual collective, make sure to visit this stall to listen to his stories and take home one for the little ones. Dwarka Prasad Jangid makes these Kaavads, paintings on wood, fabric and the puppets. And he is ever ready with the stories.

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan

 

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Kaavad from Rajasthan

Tips for home decor….I think this would make a great addition to a wall gallery or could be a part of your coffee table decor. The possibilities are endless…And when you are at the collective, do take a selfie with the gond art and the madhubani panels.Post on FB and share the joy with friends.

 

Twinkles to all of you.

Anupama.